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Book Clubs

    • March 11, 2024
    • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • William Reif Gallery
    • 12
    Register

    Join this evening women's book club! And no, you don’t have to be a "bad girl" to join the group. This group will focus on books with female authors and unique female protagonists. In depth and honest opinions are encouraged. You don’t even have to finish the book to join in on the discussion. Indulgent beverages and desserts will be served, and bad girl attire encouraged!

    Monday, March 11

    6:00 pm–8:00 pm

    Facilitator: Lisa Alexander

    From the day she watched her kindergarten teacher drop dead during a dramatic telling of Peter Rabbit, Clover Brooks has felt a stronger connection with the dying than she has with the living. After the beloved grandfather who raised her dies alone while she is traveling, Clover becomes a death doula in New York City, dedicating her life to ushering people peacefully through their end-of-life process. Clover spends so much time with the dying that she has no life of her own, until the final wishes of a feisty old woman send Clover on a trip across the country to uncover a forgotten love story — and perhaps, her own happy ending. As she finds herself struggling to navigate the uncharted roads of romance and friendship, Clover is forced to examine what she really wants, and whether she’ll have the courage to go after it.

    Probing, clever, and hopeful, The Collected Regrets of Clover is perfect for readers of The Midnight Library and Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine as it turns the normally taboo subject of death into a reason to celebrate life.

    Registration REQUIRED by March 9

    Minimum Registration: 3

    • March 13, 2024
    • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
    • William Reif Gallery
    • 14
    Register

    Wednesday, March 13

    10:00–11:30 am

    All women are invited to these discussions to share observations, enthusiasm, insights and the pure enjoyment of reading.

    A historical thriller by the Pulitzer and National Book Award-winning author that tells the riveting story of the Klan's rise to power in the 1920s, the cunning con man who drove that rise, and the woman who stopped them.

    The Roaring Twenties — the Jazz Age — has been characterized as a time of Gatsby frivolity. But it was also the height of the uniquely American hate group, the Ku Klux Klan. Their domain was not the old Confederacy, but the Heartland and the West. They hated Blacks, Jews, Catholics and immigrants in equal measure, and took radical steps to keep these people from the American promise. And the man who set in motion their takeover of great swaths of America was a charismatic charlatan named D.C. Stephenson. Stephenson was a magnetic presence whose life story changed with every telling. Within two years of his arrival in Indiana, he’d become the Grand Dragon of the state and the architect of the strategy that brought the group out of the shadows – their message endorsed from the pulpits of local churches, spread at family picnics and town celebrations. Judges, prosecutors, ministers, governors and senators across the country all proudly proclaimed their membership. But at the peak of his influence, it was a seemingly powerless woman – Madge Oberholtzer – who would reveal his secret cruelties, and whose deathbed testimony finally brought the Klan to their knees.

    A FEVER IN THE HEARTLAND marries a propulsive drama to a powerful and page-turning reckoning with one of the darkest threads in American history.

    Registration REQUIRED by March 11
    Minimum Registration: 3
    • April 08, 2024
    • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • William Reif Gallery
    • 15
    Register

    Join this evening women's book club! And no, you don’t have to be a "bad girl" to join the group. This group will focus on books with female authors and unique female protagonists. In depth and honest opinions are encouraged. You don’t even have to finish the book to join in on the discussion. Indulgent beverages and desserts will be served, and bad girl attire encouraged! 

    Monday, April 8

    6:00–8:00 pm

    Facilitator: Lisa Alexander

    Set in the days of civilization's collapse, Station Eleven tells the story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

    One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time—from the actor's early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains—this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: the actor, the man who tried to save him, the actor's first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Traveling Symphony, caught in the crosshairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet.

    Registration REQUIRED by April 6

    Minimum Registration: 3

    • April 10, 2024
    • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
    • William Reif Gallery
    • 13
    Register

    Wednesday, April 10

    10:00–11:30 am

    All women are invited to these discussions to share observations, enthusiasm, insights and the pure enjoyment of reading.

    Based on the true World War II story of the heroic librarians at the American Library in Paris, this is an unforgettable story of romance, friendship, family, and the power of literature to bring us together, perfect for fans of The Lilac Girls and The Paris Wife.

    Paris, 1939: Young and ambitious Odile Souchet has it all: her handsome police officer beau and a dream job at the American Library in Paris. When the Nazis march into Paris, Odile stands to lose everything she holds dear, including her beloved library. Together with her fellow librarians, Odile joins the Resistance with the best weapons she has: books. But when the war finally ends, instead of freedom, Odile tastes the bitter sting of unspeakable betrayal.

    Montana, 1983: Lily is a lonely teenager looking for adventure in small-town Montana. Her interest is piqued by her solitary, elderly neighbor. As Lily uncovers more about her neighbor’s mysterious past, she finds that they share a love of language, the same longings, and the same intense jealousy, never suspecting that a dark secret from the past connects them.

    A powerful novel that explores the consequences of our choices and the relationships that make us who we are—family, friends, and favorite authors—The Paris Library shows that extraordinary heroism can sometimes be found in the quietest of places.

    Registration REQUIRED by April 8
    Minimum Registration: 3


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