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BookWoman

    • February 10, 2021
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM (CST)
    • Online/ZOOM
    Register

    Wednesday, February 10

    9:30–11:00 am

    Facilitator: Julie Thompson

    This class is online only (ZOOM). Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email with the link to join the class.

    When Maya Angelou and Tavis Smiley met in 1986, he was twenty-one and she was fifty-eight. For the next twenty-eight years, they shared an unlikely, special bond. Angelou was a teacher and a maternal figure to Smiley, and they talked often, of art, politics, history, race, religion, music, love, purpose, and — more than anything — courage. Courage to be open, to follow dreams, to believe in oneself.

    In My Journey with Maya, Smiley recalls a joyful friendship filled to the brim with sparkling conversation — in Angelou's gardens surrounded by her caged birds, before lectures, sharing meals, and on breaks from it all, they sought each other out for comfort, advice, and above all else, friendship.

    It began when he, a recent college graduate and a poor kid from a big family in the Midwest, was invited to join the revered writer on a sojourn to Africa. He would be handling her bags, but Maya didn't let that stop a friendship waiting to happen. Angelou was generous, challenging, and inspirational. Like a mother to him, she was selfless.

    Here Tavis Smiley shares his personal memories of Maya Angelou, of a decades-long friendship with one of history's most fascinating women, one who left as indelible an imprint on American culture as she did on him. –goodreads.com

    All women are invited to these discussions to share observations, enthusiasm, insights and the pure enjoyment of reading.

    Register by: 2/9

    • March 10, 2021
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM (CST)
    • Online/ZOOM
    Register

    Wednesday, March 10

    9:30–11:00 am

    This class is online only (ZOOM). Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email with the link to join the class.

    Lydia Quixano Pérez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while there are cracks beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, fairly comfortable.

    Even though she knows they’ll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. And then one day a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with a few books he would like to buy—two of them her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of the newest drug cartel that has gruesomely taken over the city. When Lydia’s husband’s tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same.

    Forced to flee, Lydia and eight-year-old Luca soon find themselves miles and worlds away from their comfortable middle-class existence. Instantly transformed into migrants, Lydia and Luca ride la bestia—trains that make their way north toward the United States, which is the only place Javier’s reach doesn’t extend. As they join the countless people trying to reach el norte, Lydia soon sees that everyone is running from something. But what exactly are they running to?

     –goodreads.com

    All women are invited to these discussions to share observations, enthusiasm, insights and the pure enjoyment of reading.

    Register by: 3/9

    • April 14, 2021
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM (CDT)
    • Online/ZOOM
    Register

    Wednesday, April 14

    9:30–11:00 am

    Facilitator: Lynn Andreini

    This class is online only (ZOOM). Once you register, you will receive a confirmation email with the link to join the class.

    In the spring of 1884 Ulysses S. Grant heeded the advice of Mark Twain and finally agreed to write his memoirs. Little did Grant or Twain realize that this seemingly straightforward decision would profoundly alter not only both their lives but the course of American literature. Over the next fifteen months, as the two men became close friends and intimate collaborators, Grant raced against the spread of cancer to compose a triumphant account of his life and times — while Twain struggled to complete and publish his greatest novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

    In this deeply moving and meticulously researched book, veteran writer Mark Perry reconstructs the heady months when Grant and Twain inspired and cajoled each other to create two quintessentially American masterpieces.

     –goodreads.com

    All women are invited to these discussions to share observations, enthusiasm, insights and the pure enjoyment of reading.

    Register by: 4/13

3333 Maria Linden Drive, Rockford, IL 61114   •   Phone 815.877.0118   •   Fax 815.877.0265   •   Office Hours: Monday–Thursday 10:00a–3:00p

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